Why Mila Kunis uses Groupon and calls herself ‘a really great promo-coder’

Actress Mila Kunis stays frugal despite being worth millions of dollars — and it’s largely thanks to her immigrant experience, she said in a recent interview.

“If you’re an immigrant, you have a very different mentality,” the Ukrainian-born actor, who moved to Los Angeles around age 7, said on the podcast “Conan O’Brien Needs a Friend.” “Because I am an immigrant, I think that creates a different perspective on what the value of a dollar is and what hard work is.”

Kunis, who voiced Meg on “Family Guy” and starred in films like “Black Swan” and the “Bad Moms” franchise, was 2018’s sixth highest-paid actress, according to Forbes — raking in $16 million pre-tax between June 1, 2017 and June 1, 2018.

The actress, 35, told Conan O’Brien she had been leery about spending money prior to marrying her husband, Ashton Kutcher.

“I was such an extreme, ‘I’m gonna be broke tomorrow; I’m not gonna have a job’ — I was always living my life … so cautiously, that it took me the longest time,” Kunis said. She said Kutcher told her they would be OK. “I was like, ‘But we can’t buy this house.’ He was like, ‘What are you talking about? … I promise you, we can do this,’” she added.

The very wealthy still spend plenty of money. But Kunis is far from the only rich person who claims to love a good deal: Beyonce was reportedly spotted at a Los Angeles Target TGT, +1.54%   earlier this year, for example, while actress Kristen Bell is a self-professed couponer who says she buys many of her kids’ clothes secondhand.

Businesswoman Barbara Corcoran, a panelist on CNBC’s CMCSA, +0.42%  “Shark Tank,” told MarketWatch last year she’s “too cheap” to pay for first class. And billionaire investor Warren Buffett regularly orders McDonald’s MCD, +0.09%   breakfasts for $3.17 or below, depending on the market’s performance that day.

Some 41% of people worth $5 million or more say they shop at Target, according to a 2014 survey of investors by the investment website Millionaire Corner, while a third report shopping at Walmart. Research also shows that many folks from households making more than $100,000 enjoy shopping at dollar stores and have a penchant for clipping coupons.

Kunis, meanwhile, says she still has thrifty tendencies aimed at reducing wastefulness.

“To this day, [I] have this weird sense of, ‘You don’t need to buy that plastic bottle — we have plenty of water in the sink, and we pay very good money to have it clean, so get a glass bottle and you’re fine,’” she said. “And it’s not necessarily healthy, so I think there’s a balance to it that I’m finding.”

Part of that balance, apparently, includes the online discount company Groupon GRPN, +0.58% “I’m a big supporter of Groupon,” Kunis said. “I have walked into restaurants with a Groupon; I use it all the time.”

Asked by O’Brien if she gets “attitude” from others as a celebrity fishing for discounts, Kunis replied, “All the time.” “They’re like, ‘Really?’ And I was like, ‘Yeah, so if check in, do I still get my 10% off on this bikini wax?’”

She also pronounced herself a skilled online shopper and “a really great promo-coder.” She recalled comparison shopping online at 2 a.m. after a designer suggested some chairs that seemed overpriced. “[I’ll find] coupon codes for similar-looking chairs and send it back and be like, ‘But what about these?’ And she’s like, ‘No, no!’ So I’m still doing this.”

Kunis and Kutcher, who married in 2015, even found wedding bands on the cheap ranging from $90 to $100.

“He got me a beautiful engagement ring — like, stunning, stunning, stunning,” Kunis told O’Brien on a 2016 “Conan” episode. “[But] our wedding bands are from Etsy ETSY, -0.52%  .”

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