The Wall Street Journal: South Africa’s president Jacob Zuma digs in, resists pressure to step down

JOHANNESBURG—South African President Jacob Zuma clung to power Tuesday despite an order from the ruling African National Congress to step down amid multiple allegations of corruption.

The ANC’s secretary-general and his deputy visited the presidential guesthouse in Pretoria on Tuesday morning, where, according to state television, they delivered a letter to Zuma ordering him to step down.

In parliament, a meeting of the chief whips of all parties was scheduled for Wednesday morning, in apparent preparation for a vote of no confidence against the president. The ANC holds a large majority in the assembly, so would be able to vote out Zuma without the support of the opposition, which has long called for his exit.

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Representatives for Zuma and the ANC didn’t respond to requests for comment. The party has scheduled a news conference later Tuesday to update the nation on its decision on the president’s future.

An expanded version of this story can be found at WSJ.com

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